higher education

Emily Files

University of Wisconsin System leaders are working on safety protocols that could enable students to return to campus if the coronavirus pandemic stretches into fall, system President Ray Cross told regents Thursday.

Cross told the regents during a teleconference that system leaders want to be able to test all faculty, staff and students — a task he called “monumental.” They also want to be able to trace student contacts, create a way to isolate and quarantine the sick as well as infected people who aren't showing symptoms.

Emily Files / WUWM

Updated at 2:50 p.m. CT

University of Wisconsin System President Ray Cross directed campuses Thursday to prepare to cut academic programs and brace for layoffs as the coronavirus pandemic deepens the system's financial losses.

Cross said he wants campuses to evaluate their programs by January with an eye toward cost, whether they are duplicated at another campus, and student demand. System officials will decide which courses to eliminate subject to regents' approval, Cross told reporters during a video conference Wednesday afternoon.

Courtesy Naoshi Johnson, Jeremiah Baez and Moo Ko Wah.

This is the time of year when many high school seniors are making one of the most important decisions of their lives — where to go to college. But the coronavirus has created tremendous uncertainty as students try to plan for their future.

"I feel like at this point, I’m so lost," says Moo Ko Wah, a senior at MPS’s South Division High School. "At school I have my coaches, my mentor. And here I don’t have nobody."

Emily Files

A relatively new Milwaukee college completion charity working to bolster the number of low-income students of color earning college degrees will more than double the number of young people it serves this year.

All-In Milwaukee provides for its students what many wealthy and middle-class collegegoers take for granted: financial support, help navigating unfamiliar systems, and connections to secure job placement after graduation.

Plunkett Raysich Architects / Courtesy Mount Mary University

Milwaukee’s Mount Mary University is planning a unique housing project that will serve students who are single mothers, alongside aging nuns and other senior citizens.

Emily Files

This week, a new collaboration between two UW-Milwaukee programs is taking the stage. Students in UWM's unique American Sign Language program are providing live interpretation at a UWM student theater production — a first for the school.

Courtesy of MATC

Just 30% of adults in the city of Milwaukee have a college degree. About 22% completed some college, but didn’t graduate. Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC) is bolstering its outreach to those adults, who might be interested in giving college another shot.

Courtesy Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

In his new book, The Years That Matter Most: How College Makes or Breaks Us, education writer Paul Tough dismantles the myth of college as a pure meritocracy. Instead, he makes the case that the U.S. higher education system reinforces class and racial inequalities.

Research shows that a college degree, especially from an elite institution, increases one's chances of social mobility. But the people who could most benefit — low-income, first-generation, and black and Hispanic students — often don’t get those opportunities.

Emily Files

Several states have taken steps to make college more affordable by creating free-tuition "promise" programs. Each one is different, but in general, they allow students to attend community college, or sometimes public universities, for free.

UWM & MATC Join Animated Forces

May 20, 2019
Pimpak/adobestock.com

Cartoons and comics mean a lot to many kids.  But for some young people, the effect is especially strong and drives them to pursue a career in animation.  From medical, architectural and science, to forensics, industrial and gaming field — there's so much more to animation than Hollywood blockbuster films.

Mitch Teich

For some young people, just heading off to college can be challenging enough, even before deciding on what course of study might carry them through their adult life. One Milwaukee area school is trying to make navigating that undecided part of the college experience a little easier.

Emily Files / WUWM

Nineteen-year-old Lauren Buchanan is a student at Bethesda College, a specialized program for students with intellectual disabilities. It is run by the nonprofit Bethesda Lutheran Communities, located on Concordia University's campus in Mequon.

"I wanted to go to college because I wanted to meet new friends, see new people and, like, have good relationships, good friendships with people," Buchanan says.

UWM/M-cubed

In 2014, three major Milwaukee academic institutions were undergoing transitions to new leadership. But out of a state of flux, UW-Milwaukee, Milwaukee Area Technical College, and Milwaukee Public Schools began an alliance aimed at improving outcomes for students.

They created a network called M-cubed, with a mission of better aligning education so that students who start at MPS will have a smoother road leading to MATC, UWM, or both.

Courtesy Jesendra Tatum

Low-income students tend to face more barriers to higher education than their middle- and upper-class peers. Federal financial aid is supposed to help clear the way.

But part of the financial aid process, called verification, ensnares many low-income students in a confusing web of red tape.

Jesendra Tatum is one example. After graduating from Milwaukee School of Languages in 2018, Tatum planned to start college right away. She always wanted to be a veterinarian.

igorkol_ter/fotolia

Low-income students in Milwaukee are less likely to graduate from high school and go onto college than their wealthier counterparts. A new program launched this school year by the city of Milwaukee hopes to bridge that gap.

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