Trade

A standard river barge can hold about the same amount as 60 semitrucks. In early June, 642 of them had floated to a standstill near American Commercial Barge Line's office outside Cairo, Ill.

"That's just me. That's not the other fleets in the area," said Mark Glaab, facility manager there. "That's just ACBL."

Updated at 11:15 a.m. ET Tuesday

U.S. trade negotiators opened a new round of talks in China on Tuesday. But there appears to be little pressure for a settlement, even as the year-old conflict begins to weigh on the global economy.

"We'll see what happens," President Trump told reporters Tuesday. "We're either going to make a great deal or we're not going to make a deal at all."

Maayan Silver

Wisconsin farmers are already juggling increasing tariffs on goods to and from China. In the meantime, last week, President Trump announced that he'll steadily increase tariffs on all Mexican goods imported to the U.S. because of, what he perceives as, Mexico’s failure to stem illegal immigration.

Maayan Silver

Trade talks between China and the United States fell apart a few weeks ago. Now, the two countries are promising to levy new tariffs on each other’s goods. One commodity caught in the crosshairs: American-grown ginseng root.

President Trump will hold off raising tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars in Chinese imports, after what he called "very productive" trade talks in Washington this weekend.

Tariffs had been scheduled to jump from 10 to 25 percent next Saturday. But Trump agreed to postpone that increase in hopes of negotiating a more comprehensive trade agreement.

Quebec Representative Urges Caution On Tariffs

Dec 3, 2018
Canadian National Railway Company

Of all the employment statistics in Wisconsin, this one might be the most surprising: 16,000 workers in Wisconsin are employed by companies based in Quebec. The companies for which many of them work are well-known names — BMO Harris Bank, CN Rail and Saputo Cheese.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

The United States and Mexico have reached an "understanding" on several critical trade issues following bilateral talks to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement. They will now likely re-engage with Canada to reach a final deal on NAFTA, a primary goal of the Trump administration.

Speaking at the White House on Monday, President Trump said he wanted to change the NAFTA name to the U.S. Mexico Free Trade Agreement. He also reframed the negotiations as two bilateral trade deals.

In Wisconsin, some agricultural officials are playing the role of matchmaker. They're bringing together the state's cheesemakers with prospective international buyers for a unique speed-dating event, hoping, in part, to ease the tariff pain affecting Wisconsin cheesemakers. They are specifically targeting new markets in countries they don't usually sell to. It's especially timely because of retaliatory tariffs on dairy products from the U.S. by Mexico and China.

Janet Clark hopes to keep her dairy farm in the family. She inherited Vision Aire Farms from her parents, and now runs it with her younger brother.

The farm is idyllic, tucked away amid rolling green hills of corn and sunflower fields. One side of the farm holds a line of calves. They are individually fed by Clark's children and their cousins, playfully holding milk bottles for them to drink.

Maayan Silver

The Trump Administration announced Tuesday a $12 billion “short-term” plan to help U.S. farmers hurt by retaliatory tariffs. Agricultural officials say that the plan will involve direct payments to farmers. They also say it will involve the purchase of excess food, and trade promotion programs to help create new export markets.

President Donald Trump has come out heavily in support of his recent decisions to impose tariffs.

The Trump administration is coming to the aid of farmers hurt by its own hard-line trade policies, announcing Tuesday that it will make an estimated $12 billion in government assistance available, including direct payments to growers.

The money comes after farmers, especially soybean growers, have felt the brunt of retaliatory tariffs placed on agriculture by China and other nations that the Trump administration has penalized with tariffs on imports.

Maayan Silver

U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson met with Wisconsin business executives Monday to discuss the impact of tariffs.

President Donald Trump imposed tariffs earlier this year because he said the United States was not getting a fair share with trading partners. In return, some countries have retaliated.

In a roundtable discussion in Milwaukee, dozens of representatives of manufacturing and agricultural operations told Johnson the tariffs have been a blow to their operations.

Updated at 8:15 a.m. ET

As the day dawned across the U.S. on Friday, a new economic reality dawned with it: The tariffs long threatened against billions of dollars in Chinese goods took effect just at midnight ET while many Americans were sleeping — but Beijing was ready immediately with a wake-up call of its own.

Susan Bence

President Donald Trump visited Wisconsin Thurday to attend Foxconn's cereminial groundbreaking in Mount Pleasant. During the ceremony, Trump gave an extended speech, which ran the gamut of topics - ranging from Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy's imminent retirement to trade tariffs with other countries. Trump singled out Canada in particular, saying, "We need to level the playing field." 

The Consul General of Canada to the Midwest, John Cruickshank, takes issue with President Trump's claim that the economic playing field is tilted in Canada's favor.

Tom Henrich / Flickr

President Trump once again called out Harley-Davidson over the company's decision to move some production overseas.

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