Crime

SCREENSHOT / WISCONSIN PUBLIC TELEVISION

Democratic Gov. Tony Evers will issue Wisconsin's first pardons in nine years, invoking his constitutional power to grant clemency to four people.

Evers plans to issue the pardons Monday, the first he's making as governor after he re-started the pardons board in June. Evers' predecessor, Republican Scott Walker, never issued a single pardon over his eight years as governor.

Updated at 7:16 p.m. ET

Brandt Jean's extraordinary response to a convicted murderer — he hugged Amber Guyger as she was sentenced for killing his brother, Botham Jean — has provoked an array of reactions, from admiration to frustration. It has also deepened a national debate over regulating police use of force.

BT IMAGE / stock.adobe.com

Sexting. With technological advances, it’s a word most of us have become familiar with in recent years.

While the act of sending and receiving nude photos via an electronic device can create challenges for adults, image the havoc it can cause for teens.

Maayan Silver

Up until last year, any person in Wisconsin who had sexual contact with a child between the ages of 13 and 16 could be charged with a felony. But that law has changed.

SCREENSHOT/WISCONSIN PUBLIC TELEVISION

Gov. Tony Evers re-created Wisconsin's pardons board on Thursday, fulfilling a campaign promise to again consider granting pardons after his Republican predecessor, Scott Walker, halted the process eight years ago.

Evers, a Democrat, is putting his own mark on the process, declining to consider commutation of prison sentences as previous governors did and instituting a new restriction making people on the sex offender registry ineligible.

Angelina Mosher Salazar

As summer approaches, temperatures rise and so does crime. It's widely known that summer months are often witness to an uptick in crime. This is not news to Milwaukee's Office of Violence Prevention. In fact, they have been busy, rolling out a number of violence prevention initiatives. One particular initiative is violence interrupters.

Chuck Quirmbach

In an attempt to convince Wisconsin legislators to fund 15 additional crime lab positions — costing $1.8 million in state funds over the next two years — Attorney General Josh Kaul is touring Wisconsin State Crime Lab locations. During a visit Thursday to the lab on the south side of Milwaukee, Kaul was also urging support for a $1.9 million pay plan, which he says is needed to address pay disparities and inequities with comparable crime laboratories in the region. 

courtesy Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Alfred Kunz was a Catholic priest, the pastor of a church called St. Michael in the rural south central Wisconsin town of Dane. He served the community for years, but on March 4, 1998, he was found murdered in violent fashion in the church complex. No one has been arrested or convicted for the crime.

Updated at 5:01 p.m. ET

This week alone, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has visited three states to push the Justice Department's efforts to crack down on what he describes as a crime wave sweeping the nation.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Violent crime is up across the country, including in Milwaukee, according to US Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He held a press conference in Milwaukee Tuesday at the federal courthouse to address crime trends, and promised new measures, he said, will reduce crime rates.

Sessions said violent crime had been down for a couple of decades, but has gone up in the last two years, and he said it’s not a light matter.

On Monday, an alderman will introduce a resolution asking state legislators to toughen laws for repeat offenders. Stories of violent crime have frequently been in the news in recent times. Just a few weeks ago, a city of Milwaukee employee was killed while on the job. Gregg Zyszkiewicz was a home inspector. He was fatally shot during an attempted carjacking. Milwaukee Alderman Tony Zielinski says, for him, that was the last straw.

“We’ve got to do more to get these violent criminals who have a history of violence off of the street,” Zielinski says.

LaToya Dennis

MPD Sergeant Sheronda Grant talks about being a black police officer in Milwaukee, a minority-majority city, and during an era when police face a mix of harsh criticism and volatile situations. Grant is president of the League of Martin, an African American police association. She says the job can be especially stressful these days because what happens with police anywhere affects officers everywhere, yet she encourages young people to consider a career in law enforcement.

Bonnie Petrie / WUWM Milwaukee Public Radio

Some Milwaukee residents are arming themselves with signs and cell phones in an effort to take back their neighborhoods and their streets from people who break the law.

Florence Burt and George Gage are standing on the corner of Capitol Drive and N 60th Street in the blistering heat, waving hand-made signs saying, "Stop Means Stop." Burt says she can no longer sit at home and complain about the reckless driving on the north side. Gauge agrees. He says he’s sick of drivers in his neighborhood doing whatever they please.

'Unsolved' Chapter Six: Blinded By Science

Feb 26, 2016
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

By 2009, Detective Kent Schoonover fears the chance to solve John Zera's murder has slipped away, in part because the eccentric medical examiner who did the autopsy made a mess of it.

Read the Journal Sentinel's full story. 

Our broadcast of the Unsolved podcast over the next week is presented in partnership with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

'Unsolved' Chapter Five: What Did We Miss?

Feb 25, 2016
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Two years after John Zera was murdered, an anonymous tip about a Franklin High substitute teacher with an unusual interest in boys' feet would generate a new prime suspect.

Read the Journal Sentinel's full story. 

Our broadcast of the Unsolved podcast over the next week is presented in partnership with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

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