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Now another story we're following today - CIA Director Gina Haspel gave a rare public speech in remarks at Auburn University in Alabama. Haspel did not specifically address the Russia investigation and the Mueller report, but she did talk about Russia in general and its increasingly difficult relations with the U.S.

NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre was there. He's now on the line. And Greg, let's start with what she had to say about Russia.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Now another story we're following today - CIA Director Gina Haspel gave a rare public speech in remarks at Auburn University in Alabama. Haspel did not specifically address the Russia investigation and the Mueller report, but she did talk about Russia in general and its increasingly difficult relations with the U.S.

NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre was there. He's now on the line. And Greg, let's start with what she had to say about Russia.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now another story we're following today - CIA Director Gina Haspel gave a rare public speech in remarks at Auburn University in Alabama. Haspel did not specifically address the Russia investigation and the Mueller report, but she did talk about Russia in general and its increasingly difficult relations with the U.S.

NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre was there. He's now on the line. And Greg, let's start with what she had to say about Russia.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now another story we're following today - CIA Director Gina Haspel gave a rare public speech in remarks at Auburn University in Alabama. Haspel did not specifically address the Russia investigation and the Mueller report, but she did talk about Russia in general and its increasingly difficult relations with the U.S.

NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre was there. He's now on the line. And Greg, let's start with what she had to say about Russia.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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It has been roughly 22 months since special counsel Robert Mueller began his investigation into the 2016 election. Along the way, he's charged 34 people, including 25 Russians. More than seven have been found guilty of crimes.

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. In the Stanley Cup playoffs this week, the high-flying Tampa Bay Lightning got swept by Columbus. No one saw this coming, including one Reddit user, WMino. He vowed to eat his hat if the Lightning lost in four games.

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Spain is marking the 80th anniversary of the end of its civil war. Almost every family in the country was affected by the conflict.

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We're expecting a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report to be released tomorrow. Lawmakers and the public alike will get the chance to read for themselves what the special counsel unearthed, disregarded and concluded. And while fights over the report are going to keep going, this release is the culmination of investigations that go back nearly three years, reaching across continents and into President Trump's inner circle. NPR justice reporter Ryan Lucas takes us back to the beginning.

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