Becky Mortensen

Lake Effect Executive Producer

Becky Mortensen joined WUWM as the Executive Producer of Lake Effect in November 2019.

Before joining WUWM, she was the Executive Producer at CBS 58 News in Milwaukee. She worked in a variety of roles during her seven years at CBS 58 including creating and producing the 4 p.m. newscast. She was nominated for an Emmy in 2016 for her work during the Sherman Park unrest.

Becky came to Milwaukee in 2012. Before that, she worked as a producer at WDIO News, interned at KUMD Radio and wrote for the online publication Lake Voice News. She graduated from the University of Minnesota-Duluth with a Writing Studies degree with an emphasis in journalism.

Screenshot / WUWM / Facebook

Lake Effect On-Site normally is about getting out into the community and taking a deep dive into a specific area of Milwaukee. But at a time when gathering together can be dangerous, there are still ways to celebrate the many things that our community has to offer.

So, the On-Site series moved off-site to celebrate one of our favorite holidays: Halloween.

Watch the full Lake Effect Off-Site: Halloween Edition below.

Brandon Bell / Getty Images

Over the last week, the national spotlight has been on Kenosha, Wis. Demonstrations began there after Jacob Blake was shot in the back by Kenosha police officer Rusten Sheskey.

paulvelgos / stock.adobe.com

As frequent travelers know, or just about anyone who’s ever stayed in a hotel, you’re pretty much guaranteed some reading material in your room. 

The Bible can be found in more than half of bedside tables in hotel rooms. Largely thanks to Gideons International, which has donated over 1 billion Bibles worldwide.

Audrey Nowakowski

Lake Effect recently traveled to the Cabot Theatre, a stage in the Broadway Theatre Center that's in the heart and soul of Milwaukee's Third Ward, for its latest Lake Effect On-Site. In this performing arts themed show, we learn how the Third Ward transformed from vegetable warehouses to an artistic hub. It was also Bonnie North's farewell show, marking the end of her 14-year career at WUWM.

Audrey Nowakowski

Lidia Bastianich is an Emmy-winning television host, a successful chef and restaurateur, and a best-selling cookbook author. She made her name by introducing American diners to the dishes of her Italian childhood.

Bastianich spent the first 10 years of her life with her grandmother in Croatia. “I was grandma's little helper sort of running things,” she says. “I grew up in that setting of food you know, cooking with grandma, feeding the animals.”

Bonnie North

About six years ago, a group of Milwaukee musicians got together to form Panalure. The band is Americana with a touch of blues and Celtic thrown in. Some of the members had played together in different configurations, but the group came together when bassist, Ken Hanson approached frontman Fred Ziegler.

successphoto / stock.adobe.com

Fatty foods, alcohol, and overeating are hallmarks of holiday feasts. Overindulging can be a recipe for heartburn and acid reflux, especially for those living with gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as GERD.

The Couture Milwaukee

The site of the proposed Couture building has been plagued by problems for more than half a century. It was once the site of the historic Lake Front Depot, which heralded guests on Chicago-Northwestern rail lines for more than 80 years.

ysbrandcosijn / stock.adobe.com

The cold weather that settled in earlier this month was unexpected for people and gardens. Snow came unexpectedly while people were still dealing with fall cleanup, which didn't allow for regular winterizing of gardens. However, there's still work that can be done.

Gardening expert Melinda Myers first recommends getting fallen leaves that may have been covered by snow and frost raked up before the deep freeze really sets in.

Kat Schleicher / Milwaukee Magazine

Liz Gilbert sees the Democratic National Convention (DNC) as a huge opportunity for Milwaukee and Wisconsin. For many of the 50,000 people expected to attend, this will be their first time visiting. Gilbert, the host committee president, sees it as a chance to shape people's perception of the city.

"When we talk about the amount of influence this convention can have on stories and messaging about this town and about this incredible state, the opportunities really are endless," she says.

UW-Milwaukee

Many of us cook every day. But we probably don't put a lot of thought into the scientific makeup of our food.

Humans are perhaps the only animal that actually cooks food before consuming it. Some scientists believe our ability to manipulate food has had a profound effect on our evolution. The science behind cooked food may be just as profound, according to UW-Milwaukee physics professor Paul Lyman.

He explores everything from how cheese is made, to how the scientific makeup of an egg allows it to be cooked and then consumed.