Elena Moore

Elena Moore is an editorial assistant for NPR's Washington Desk working as the researcher for the 2020 campaign. She previously worked at NBC News and is also a proud former Washington Desk intern. Moore is a graduate from The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and is originally from Brooklyn, N.Y.

President elect-Biden has named Louisa Terrell as White House director of legislative affairs, marking another step for Biden as he continues to assemble his policy operation.

Terrell is currently part of Biden's transition team. She previously worked in the Obama administration, assisting then-President Barack Obama with legislative affairs as well.

Terrell also has a background in the U.S. Senate, working for then-Sen. Biden and Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J.

President-elect Joe Biden has won Georgia, according to a race call from The Associated Press, making it the final state to be decided in the presidential election.

The AP's call came more than two weeks after Election Day, but shortly after the state released results of a hand-conducted audit.

Updated on Nov. 30 at 1:30 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden is assembling his inner circle of advisers and Cabinet officials as Inauguration Day on Jan. 20 draws closer.

Updated at 2:42 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden will take office in January with a lot of promises to keep. He has pledged to enact new policies swiftly that veer the U.S. off President Trump's current path.

President Barack Obama congratulated President-elect Joe Biden on his win, urging unity and saying that Biden will "do the job with the best interests of every American at heart, whether or not he had their vote."

The Associated Press called the race for Biden on Saturday morning.

"I encourage every American to give [Biden] a chance and lend him your support," Obama said, adding, "the election results at every level show that the country remains deeply and bitterly divided."

Supporters of President-elect Joe Biden are flocking Saturday to the streets in Washington D.C., to celebrate the news of the Democrat surpassing 270 electoral votes, according to The Associated Press and other news organizations. A large crowd is gathering in Lafayette Square and Black Lives Matter Plaza, areas right next to the White House.

Updated at 10:26 p.m. ET

The second of two Georgia Senate races advancing to a runoff, according to The Associated Press, likely pushing Democrats' hopes of a possible majority in the U.S. Senate back to January.

Republican incumbent Sen. David Perdue holds just under 50% of the vote in the state, closely trailed by Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff.

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger told reporters that the state will conduct a recount given the razor-thin margin between former Vice President Joe Biden and President Trump.

"The focus for our office and for the county elections officials for now remains on making sure that every legal vote is counted and recorded accurately," Raffensperger said.

"As we are closing in on a final count, we can begin to look toward our next steps. With a margin that small, there will be a recount in Georgia," he predicted.

The winner of the presidential race has not yet been determined in Georgia, which remains one of the most closely watched battleground states of the 2020 campaign. Ballots continue to be counted in what could well help determine the fate not just of the presidency but also the balance of power in the Senate and the final composition of the House of Representatives. Here is where the state currently stands:

The presidential race

President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden have very different views on how to tackle America's pressing issues.

That much is clear. But what specifically are they proposing?

NPR Politics has sifted through Trump's and Biden's plans, as released by their campaigns, and narrowed in on a few key issues to show what they're promising and how each man's priorities differ from his opponent's.

Read all of the plans here.

Key priorities

Joe Biden

  • Make public colleges, historically Black colleges and universities, and minority-serving institutions tuition-free for families making less than $125,000.
  • Make two years of community college and training programs tuition-free.
  • Cancel $10,000 of every American's student debt and revise the current loan repayment system.
  • Establish universal prekindergarten.

Key Priorities: COVID-19

Joe Biden

  • Testing: Improve testing capacity and accessibility,
  • PPE: Expand access to personal protective equipment, or PPE.
  • Vaccine: Establish a plan for effectively producing and safely distributing a vaccine.
  • Race: Address disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on communities of color.

Key priorities

Joe Biden

  • Combat climate change by pushing the United States on a path toward net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, with an intermediate goal of ridding the power sector of carbon pollution by 2035.
  • Invest $2 trillion over four years in green areas, including infrastructure, transportation and auto industries, housing and construction practices, nature conservation efforts and work in environmental justice.

Key priorities

Joe Biden

  • Create a public option health care plan that expands off the Affordable Care Act.
  • Decrease the price of prescription drugs.
  • Protect abortion access.
  • Invest $775 billion in child and elder care.
  • Read details of Biden's plans below.

Donald Trump

Key Priorities: Economy

Joe Biden

  • Increase investments in American-made products and companies, pouring $400 billion into procurement and $300 billion into research and development, with the aim of creating 5 million new jobs.
  • Reverse Trump tax breaks to corporations and seek a higher minimum wage and expanded benefits for low- and middle-income workers.
  • Read details of Biden's plans below.

Pages