Natalie Escobar

Natalie Escobar is an assistant editor on the Code Switch team, where she edits the blog and newsletter, runs the social media accounts and leads audience engagement. Before coming to NPR in 2020, Escobar was an assistant editor and editorial fellow at The Atlantic, where she covered family life and education. She also was a ProPublica emerging reporter fellow, where she helped their Illinois bureau do experimental audience engagement through theater workshops. (Really!)

Escobar graduated from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism with a degree in Magazine Journalism and Latino Studies.

A little under a year ago, Eso Won Books, a Black-owned bookstore in Los Angeles, hosted Ibram X. Kendi for a signing. Eso Won sold about 40 copies of Kendi's newest book, How to Be an Antiracist, that night. In the months after, they sold very few.

But in these past few weeks? They've sold 500 copies — and counting.

Today, the 643,000 DACA recipients in the United States can breathe a little easier.

After the Supreme Court's 5-4 decision allowing the Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals Program to remain in place, calling the Trump administration's rescinding of the program "arbitrary and capricious", it's been a cause for celebration—if a cautious one— by advocates and the "Dreamers".

Over the past two weeks, we've watched the country grapple with questions about race and policing. And while those questions might be new to some, they're ones we've been thinking about since the very beginning of Code Switch.

When director Alice Wu's Saving Face premiered in 2004, it stood out from the vast majority of films being produced at the time. The protagonist, a Chinese American woman named Wilhemina Pang, falls in love with a woman, and has to figure out how to come out to her disapproving mother. She also has to navigate the sometimes judging eyes of her extended Chinese community in Queens—characters played by an all-Asian, Mandarin-speaking cast. Tears are shed and angry words shouted, but—spoiler alert—there's a happy ending; the women end up together, and publicly declare their love.