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NPR News

  • The U.S. has spent millions of dollars since the 1980s on anti-drug ads. But research shows that some of these older public service announcements might be counterproductive. Now that the ads are shifting to reach teens who want to rebel, new studies show they may actually be more effective.
  • The new book The Pun Also Rises, by 1995 O. Henry Pun-Off World Champion John Pollack, traces the surprising long and rich history of what some people call the lowest form of humor.
  • Chef Barton Seaver wants you to look a fish in the eye before you eat it. In a new cookbook, he highlights the importance of sustainable seafood to the long-term viability of our environment and our diets.
  • Bill James is best known for his contributions to baseball, but his latest book focuses on another, very different, favorite pastime: crime stories. Popular Crime looks at the effects infamous crimes have had on our culture.
  • Betty White has been on television — in her words — "forever." Her new memoir, If You Ask Me, focuses on the past 15 years of her life and career. Far from slowing down, that career has been skyrocketing as a new generation gets to know her.
  • Just in time for Mother's Day, Melanie Notkin has come out with Savvy Auntie, a guidebook for women who don't have children, but still love them. A proud aunt to many, Notkin explains how to play a fun and supportive role in the lives of your nieces, nephews and god-children.
  • It isn't easy to transition from teen idol to Hollywood star — and while heartthrob Rob Lowe may have succeeded, that's not to say his career hasn't seen some historic highs and lows. He chronicles his journey from the Brat Pack to The West Wing in a new memoir, Stories I Only Tell My Friends.