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Curious Campus

  • A review of research on childhood obesity during the pandemic indicates that what was a problem before COVID-19 is even more so after the last two years of altered behaviors.
  • Obesity affects nearly one in five children, with higher rates among communities of color. A review of research on childhood obesity during the pandemic indicates that what was a problem before COVID-19 is even more so after the last two years of altered behaviors.According to one 2021 study, researchers found that young people ages two–19 had a monthly rate of increase in BMI that nearly doubled during COVID when compared with a pre-pandemic period.On this episode of Curious Campus, we chat with two experts in childhood obesity. Julie Snethen is a professor and director of the Ph.D. program at UWM’s College of Nursing. Cindy Greenberg is dean of the College of Health and Human Development at California State University, Fullerton.
  • A look at ways to offer STEM-related opportunities in school that could help more children, especially students of color, view themselves as mathematicians or scientists.
  • Mathematics and science are core subjects in school and form the base for many career opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields.However, many children may not view themselves as mathematicians or scientists. And students of color especially may not get opportunities in schools that could encourage them to continue pursuing courses in higher-level math or STEM-related fields.On this episode of Curious Campus, we talk to two guests who are looking at ways to expand opportunities in math and encourage diversity in STEM fields. DeAnn Huinker is a professor of mathematics education at UWM’s School of Education. Danielle Robinson is a mathematics coach for Milwaukee Public Schools.
  • Learn more about FlexRide Milwaukee, a pilot transit project that connects workers from the city, including three segregated neighborhoods on Milwaukee’s north and northwest sides, to employers in Butler and Menomonee Falls seeking workers.On this episode of Curious Campus, we talk with two urban planners leading the project. Lingqian “Ivy” Hu is professor and chair of the urban planning department at UWM’s School of Architecture and Urban Planning, and Kevin Muhs is executive director of the Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission. FlexRide Milwaukee is funded by a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation.
  • Learn more about a pilot transit project that connects workers from Milwaukee, including three segregated neighborhoods on the city’s north and northwest sides, to employers in Butler and Menomonee Falls seeking workers.
  • Two UWM researchers are uncovering the history of covenants language added to deeds stipulating that only white people could own or live on a property. Covenants were commonplace by the turn of the 20th century. Their use declined in the 1950s when they were no longer enforceable, though covenants did help to shape what housing in Milwaukee looks like today.On this episode of Curious Campus, we talk with Anne Bonds, associate professor of geography, and Derek Handley, assistant professor of English, about their project, “Mapping Racism and Resistance in Milwaukee County.” They’re studying the history and impact of covenants, as well as the precedent that protests to covenants set for today’s racial equity movements.
  • Two UWM researchers are uncovering the history of covenants language added to deeds stipulating that only white people could own or live on a property. Although no longer enforceable, covenants did help to shape what housing in Milwaukee looks like today.
  • A century ago, a Negro League baseball team called Milwaukee home. With the Major League Baseball lockout leaving the start of spring training this month in doubt, Brewers fans can take this opportunity to look back at the Milwaukee Bears.On this episode of Curious Campus, we talk with Ken Bartelt, a UWM doctoral student in history, about his work looking at the Negro Leagues in Milwaukee. He’s joined by Neal Pease, a retired UWM professor of history who taught a course on baseball and American history. Pease inspired Bartelt to use his interest in baseball to look at how history influences contemporary issues.
  • A century ago, a Negro League baseball team called Milwaukee home. Meet two historians who take a look back at the short-lived Milwaukee Bears and America’s complex approach to baseball and race.