Aarti Shahani

Regulate us. That's the unexpected message from one of the country's leading tech executives. Microsoft President Brad Smith argues that governments need to put some "guardrails" around engineers and the tech titans they serve.

If public leaders don't, he says, the Internet giants will cannibalize the very fabric of this country.

"We need to work together; we need to work with governments to protect, frankly, something that is far more important than technology: democracy. It was here before us. It needs to be here and healthy after us," Smith says.

Updated at 3:08 p.m. ET

State attorneys general of 48 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia announced a major probe Monday into Google's dominance in search and advertising for practices that harm competition as well as consumers. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is leading the bipartisan pack.

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At the G-7 summit, President Trump wouldn't say if he'd back down from his threat to go after France's most beloved export, wine, in retaliation for France's new digital tax on big tech companies. NPR's Aarti Shahani has the story.

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Lisa Cameron is a member of the British Parliament. She's also a victim, and survivor, of online trolls.

Cameron was new to politics in 2015, when she was elected in East Kilbride, Scotland. She'd been a clinical psychologist, a wife, a mom, and a trade union representative — the kind of political newcomer democracies want to run for office.

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So as we just heard, many experts say 8chan has become this big, powerful, dangerous site. And we want to dig a little deeper and hear a little more about how it has become a real go-to for white terrorist extremists.

Here's NPR's Aarti Shahani.

Updated at 1:23 p.m. ET

Facebook has a long track record in deception: telling people one thing, while doing another. That's according to federal regulators, at least one of whom says the government missed its chance to find out why the company has repeatedly misled its users.

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Mark Zuckerberg has a stunning new responsibility. The founder of Facebook is now required personally to give regular progress reports directly to federal regulators. He needs to show Facebook's progress in protecting the privacy of users. This is part of a newly announced settlement between Facebook and the Federal Trade Commission, a settlement that also includes a $5 billion fine for past violations. NPR's Aarti Shahani is on this story. Hi there, Aarti.

AARTI SHAHANI, BYLINE: Hi.

INSKEEP: What does Zuckerberg himself have to do exactly?

Updated at 12:16 p.m. ET

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will have to personally answer to federal regulators under an agreement to settle a privacy case with the Federal Trade Commission that includes a $5 billion penalty for the giant social media company, the agency announced Wednesday. Separately, Facebook will pay $100 million to settle a case with the Securities and Exchange Commission for making misleading disclosures about the risk that users' data would be misused, the SEC said.

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Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

Given Facebook's track record of broken promises over privacy, U.S. senators said Tuesday that the social media giant can't be trusted when it comes to plans to launch a digital currency.

"Facebook is dangerous," Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, said at a Senate Banking Committee hearing. "Like a toddler who's gotten his hands on a book of matches, Facebook has burned down the house over and over, and called every arson a learning experience."

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