Coronavirus

This illustration reveals the ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Credit Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Find the latest WUWM and NPR coverage on COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, here.

Wisconsin and Milwaukee by the numbers, as of June 4, according to state Department of Health Services (unless otherwise noted):

  • 626 people in Wisconsin have died from COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus (state and Milwaukee County reports) — 288 of those deaths were in Milwaukee County.
  • Wisconsin has at least 19,892 confirmed cases.
  • Milwaukee County has 8,463 confirmed cases, according to reports from the county. The county also says, "Due to the nature of COVID-19 community spread and testing, the number of positive cases is likely much higher than that listed as a result of unreported or untested cases in our community."

People who've tested positive for COVID-19 have a range of symptoms, including fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Most people develop mild symptoms. But some people, usually with pre-existing medical conditions, may develop more serious illness. Symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after contact with someone who has COVID-19, believes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There's currently no vaccine to prevent the COVID-19 infection. The CDC has shared some tips to prepare your home for community transmission of the disease. To protect yourself, health officials recommend you:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol when soap and water are unavailable.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your mouth/nose with tissue or sleeve when coughing or sneezing.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

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Candelas Guitars, a neighborhood fixture in East Los Angeles, has been hit hard by the coronavirus shutdown.

The shop has been serving customers since 1947, and Tomás Delgado says his family has been making guitars in Los Angeles for three generations. But the business, named after Delgado's great-uncle Candelario, dates back even further, when his family lived in Mexico.

In nationwide demonstrations against the police killing of George Floyd and other black Americans, protesters are frequently pepper sprayed or enveloped in clouds of tear gas. These crowd-control weapons are rarely lethal, but in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, there are growing calls for police to stop using these chemical irritants, because they can damage the body in ways that can spread the coronavirus and increase the severity of COVID-19.

President Trump's remarks are scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. ET. Watch them live here.

Updated at 10:26 a.m. ET

India and Pakistan have experienced their largest single-day increase in coronavirus infections, confirming more than 14,700 cases between them Friday, as the virus shows no sign of peaking in South Asia.

Each country now exceeds the number of reported cases from China, where the pandemic originated.

A large study of the drug hydroxychloroquine has been retracted by three of its authors.

The paper, published in the journal the Lancet last month, concluded that hydroxychloroquine, taken either alone or with an antibiotic, to treat patients with COVID-19 was of no benefit and actually increased a patient's risk of dying.

STEFFAVILLE / Wikimedia Commons

All prisoners and staff in Wisconsin's 36 adult prisons will be tested for COVID-19 under the state Department of Corrections' plan to resume more normal operations.

Getty Images

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett says COVID-19 remains a threat, but there have been enough improvements in testing, tracing and other benchmarks to advance the city to Phase 3 of its Moving Milwaukee Forward Safely Plan. That means a number of Milwaukee businesses can expand their operations beginning Friday.

As of 2 p.m. Friday, bars and restaurants will be allowed to open their doors for indoor seating for the first time since mid-March. The number of customers must not exceed 25% of each restaurant’s capacity.

All laboratories will now be required to include detailed demographic data when they report the results of coronavirus tests to the federal government, including the age, sex, race and ethnicity of the person tested, the Trump administration announced Thursday.

The new requirement, which will go into effect Aug. 1, is designed to help provide long-sought, crucial information needed to monitor and fight the pandemic nationally.

It's counterintuitive.

At a time of roiling civil unrest and an unprecedented economic crisis, stock prices are chugging along quite nicely. In fact, they have rebounded sharply since the dark days of March.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average, which lost 37% of its value between Feb. 12 and March 23, has now regained more than two-thirds of the ground it lost. Same with the broader S&P 500 index.

Chuck Quirmbach

Wisconsin economic development leaders say they're still about 10 days from accepting applications for $75 million in federal grants to small businesses hurt by the COVID-19 pandemic. But state officials also say they're working on the right message for independent-minded Wisconsin.

WUWM

Officials at Milwaukee Mitchell International Airport say airline passengers are slowly returning to the skies. They also say travelers should have a mask or other face covering with them.

As with many other airports during the COVID-19 pandemic, Mitchell lost about 90% of its business at one point. Mitchell official Pat Rowe says lately, passenger volume is up, but only about 10%.

Marti Mikkelson / WUWM

Summerfest 2020 is canceled. According to a press release, the Milwaukee World Festival, Inc. Board of Directors decided to cancel this year's festival "due to the ongoing uncertainty surrounding large gatherings due to the COVID-19 pandemic."

Updated at 8:47 a.m. ET

The coronavirus pandemic has pushed unemployment to its highest level since the Great Depression, but the pace of layoffs has been easing. And there are now some signs that the job market could slowly start to recover.

The Labor Department says another 1.87 million people filed claims for unemployment insurance last week. That's down 249,000 from the previous week. While still very high by historical standards, the number has been declining steadily from a peak of 6.8 million the week ending March 28.

A nun in headphones is on the radio — offering expectant families advice for stimulating fetal development.

"Tell the husband to pat [your] tummy," she laughs. "And speak to the [baby]!"

When Sister Astridah Banda, a Catholic nun and social worker in Zambia, first went on the air, she recalls that people were jolted by her manner. "People are always surprised to see sisters can joke," she says. "They think you're always serious and praying – and in such instances, I look at myself and say 'Madame, you and I are one and the same."

Marc Rebillet was supposed to be on tour this summer, playing electronic music at festivals throughout the United States and Europe.

"Of course, those have been canceled," the New York City-based musician said.

As COVID-19 sweeps across the world, musicians have been forced to postpone, reschedule or cancel tours altogether, leaving countless artists struggling to maintain their livelihoods.

For Rebillet, bidding farewell to live shows means he is not only losing ticket sales, but also the force that fueled his work.

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