Senator Ron Johnson

Stefani Reynolds / Getty Images

It's been four months of nearly non-stop controversy for Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson. He has been a key supporter of former President Donald Trump's claims of voter fraud and has gone a step further to question whether the U.S. Capitol protestors in January were armed, and whether some of them were not Trump supporters.  

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

President Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package passed the House of Representatives over the weekend with the backing of all three Wisconsin House Democrats, and none of the state's five Republican Representatives.

The spotlight this week, and maybe next, will be on the U.S. Senate. Wisconsin Democrat Tammy Baldwin is expected to vote for the measure, while it's predicted Republican Ron Johnson will oppose it.

Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson has been making national headlines. Last week, Wisconsin’s senior senator told a Milwaukee radio host that the deadly riot that occurred at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 “didn’t seem like an armed insurrection to me.” He said he’d like to find out whether any firearms were confiscated and how many shots were fired. 

Lasry For Wisconsin / YouTube

Democrat Alex Lasry, a 33-year-old Milwaukee Bucks executive and son of a billionaire, announced Wednesday that he's running for the U.S. Senate in 2022 for the seat held by Republican Ron Johnson.

The race is expected to be one of the most hotly contested in the country with control of the Senate hanging in the balance. Johnson, who rose out of the tea party movement, is one of former President Donald Trump's most ardent supporters representing a state that President Joe Biden won by fewer than 21,000 votes.

Samuel Corum / Getty Images

Wisconsin's Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson downplayed the storming of the U.S. Capitol last month, saying on conservative talk radio Monday that it “didn't seem like an armed insurrection to me.”

Johnson's comments on WISN-AM in Milwaukee came after he voted Saturday to acquit former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial. Johnson said in the interview that Trump's attorneys “eviscerated” legal arguments made by Democrats seeking to convict Trump for instigating the insurrection.

Photo by Jim Lo Scalzo-Pool/Getty Images

Wisconsin Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson claims that a large portion of Americans no longer trust the election system. On Wednesday, he held a hearing on what he called irregularities in the 2020 presidential election.

It was his final meeting as chair of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. Johnson opened the hearing saying many citizens have a number of reasons to question the election results. He said they include the Democratic investigation into Russian involvement in the election four years ago.

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Updated Saturday at 11:11 a.m. CT

Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, of Wisconsin, said Friday that half the country will not accept the outcome of the presidential election if Democrat Joe Biden wins.

Johnson, a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump, also refused to say if he thought the election was legitimate, while admitting he had no proof of any illegal activity.

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

The impeachment investigation and hearings have dominated headlines (and air time) for weeks. Thursday morning, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced the House will be moving forward with articles of impeachment. Wisconsin U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson has been at the center of these investigations. 

Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson will come to Milwaukee today Monday to host a hearing on the city’s school Choice program. He specifically wants information about a federal probe that’s been underway. It’s been looking into whether the voucher program has discriminated against students with disabilities. The investigation started nearly eight years ago.

Senator Ron Johnson says he has every right to demand answers from the Justice Department because he’s chairman of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

The outcome of next year’s battle between former senator Russ Feingold and incumbent Ron Johnson could determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

The contest will be a rematch of 2010, when Johnson ousted Feingold.

Wisconsin first sent Feingold to the Senate in 1992. The Democrat was perhaps best known for shepherding through bipartisan campaign finance reform, and casting the lone “no” vote against the Patriot Act, after the 9-11 attacks.

President Obama will deliver his State of the Union address Tuesday night.

Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin is the new chairman of the Senate Homeland Security committee.

He hopes the president devotes much of his speech to how he intends to better protect Americans.

"The world is witnessing the growth of Islamic terror, the growth of Isis, the attacks in Sydney and Paris.  This isn't going away.  Americans are looking for policies and leadership that will keep Americans safe and secure, in terms of national security and economic security," Johnson says.

Wisconsin Sen. Johnson is suing the administration for offering health care subsidies to Congress and its aides, if they buy plans on the federal exchange.

The federal government is back in gear and a default has been sidestepped after action late Wednesday.

Senator Johnson Pioneers 'Tele-Town Halls'

Sep 18, 2013
Senate website

For years, local town hall meetings have been a venue enabling people to have access to their elected officials. But politics and technology are changing the town hall dynamic for at least one Wisconsin politician.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Halfway through his first term in office, Republican Ron Johnson is now the senior senator from Wisconsin.

Prosecutors have charged Ronn Johnson, in cases involving five children.