shooting

Middleton Police Department/Facebook

Update 1:57 p.m.: The man who allegedly entered a Middleton, Wis., office building Wednesday morning and opened fire has died after being shot by police. The suspect injured three people who are being treated at area hospitals. 

Officials have lifted the lockdown at the office building where the shooting occurred around 10 a.m.

Updated at 8:20 a.m. ET on Friday

Five people were killed and at least two others were wounded in a shooting at the Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Md., officials announced at a news conference Thursday afternoon.

Acting Anne Arundel County Police Chief William Krampf confirmed an adult male is in custody and was being interrogated by law enforcement.

If this were a normal Monday morning, students at Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas, would be heading back to class. Instead, school is closed, its classrooms still a crime scene. The big question for investigators: How did a gunman walk into school Friday morning, killing 10 people and wounding 13?

But Katelyn "Kayte" Alford and her 1,400 classmates struggle with a different question: How do we move on from this?

Updated at 10:45 p.m. ET

At least 10 people were killed when a gunman opened fire inside a small-town Texas high school, in what Gov. Greg Abbott called "probably the worst disaster ever to strike this community."

Ten others were wounded in the morning attack at Santa Fe High School.

Lauren Keene

Hundreds of thousands of people took part in the March For Our Lives in Washington D.C., including survivors of the February 14 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.

UW-Milwaukee's journalism department took a group of twelve students on an immersion trip to cover the march and gain hands-on reporting experience. Among them was Lauren Keene, who interviewed Randi Patregnani, a Stoneman Douglas student who survived the now-infamous school shooting.

Washington, D.C. March For Our Lives: Henry Morgan

On March 24, 2018, people across the country marched for tighter gun regulation at "March For Our Lives" events. In Washington, D.C. an estimated 800,000 people gathered. This was all organized by students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after they experienced a school shooting in February that left 17 people dead. 

The air filled with chanting of "vote them out," "we've had enough," and "not one more" as the crowd took over Pennsylvania Avenue in D.C. The group included people of different backgrounds and ages, and with different reasons to march.

Updated at 3:40 a.m. ET on Wednesday

A woman with an apparent grudge against YouTube for what she claimed was censoring and de-monetizing her videos, opened fire at the video-sharing service's San Bruno, Calif., headquarters, wounding several people before fatally shooting herself, according to police.

Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET

Two students were injured when another student opened fire at Great Mills High School in St. Mary's County, Md., according to the local sheriff. The shooter, identified by the sheriff as 17-year-old Austin Wyatt Rollins, was confirmed dead after being taken to a hospital.

After Parkland, there have been many calls to make schools a "harder target" — for example, by arming teachers. But there's a decent amount of research out there on what actually makes schools safer, and most of it doesn't point to more guns.

UW-Milwaukee Chief of Police on Campus Safety

Mar 6, 2018
Claudia Delgadillo

Schools across the nation are reacting to inform students, staff and parents about the safety on school campuses following the high school shooting in Parkland, Florida at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee sent out a Campus Safety newsletter via email to students and staff with ways to stay safe on campus.

The university offers self-defense training as well as active shooter training, which UWM Chief Police Joseph LeMire says should be mandated.

Friends, family and neighbors were worried about Nikolas Cruz. So were social workers, teachers and sheriff's deputies in two counties.

As classes at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School resumed two weeks after the shooting rampage that left 17 people dead, it is increasingly clear that Cruz, the alleged gunman, was deeply troubled.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

The FBI says that someone called its tip line to report concerns about Nikolas Cruz, who has told police he killed 17 people in a Florida high school this week — but that the bureau failed to follow protocols to assess the threat.

The bureau says a person close to Cruz contacted the FBI's Public Access Line on Jan. 5 to report concerns about him. Those concerns included information about Cruz's gun ownership, a desire to kill people, erratic behavior and disturbing social media posts.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

Court documents say the suspect in the shootings at a South Florida high school has confessed to investigators. Nikolas Cruz, 19, has been booked on 17 charges of premeditated murder at Broward County's Main Jail in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Updated at 10:20 p.m. ET

A shooter in Northern California has killed at least four people in a violent rampage that began at a home and ultimately included seven locations, including an elementary school, officials say.

The shooter was killed by police, bringing the total death toll to five. Ten people have been hospitalized, authorities say.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

President Trump says the people of Las Vegas have shown the world their character, courage and resolve in the wake of Sunday's shooting massacre.

The president and first lady visited Las Vegas on Wednesday to show support for the victims as well as the people who cared for them.

"The only message I can say is that we're with you 100 percent," Trump said at University Medical Center, were dozens of the wounded were being treated. As he spoke, the president was surrounded by doctors and nurses in lab coats and scrubs.

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