Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

Allison Dikanovic / Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

Editor’s note from Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service: To protect the privacy of the children included in this story, Camp Reunite requested that NNS only use first names for campers.

Bridget Davis eagerly waved one hand in the air and wiped a tear from her eye with the other one as a yellow school bus pulled up in front of Taycheedah Correctional Institution. Her son Lawson was on the bus, and the last time she saw him was more than a year ago, when she dropped him off at school.

“I can’t wait to see him,” she said.

Mark Doremus

Look around Milwaukee and it’s easy to notice a rise in reckless driving. And while sometimes you wish that there were a police car in the area to stop a reckless driver, there has also been a rise in police pursuits in Milwaukee. And that has people worried as well.

If you were on social media over the weekend, you probably saw the video.

A stolen Ford Escape tumbling end-over-end on North 45th and West Center Street after rear-ending a taxi and striking a pole — with police in hot pursuit.

Courtesy of Department of Corrections

There were few surprises in Gov. Tony Evers' two-year budget proposal, but one thing stood out to many: an increase in the Department of Corrections budget. The proposal includes increased funds to replace the embattled Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake youth prisons, which have been the subject of several costly lawsuits in recent years.

When it comes to replacing Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake youth prisons, there is no shortage of opinions. Or outrage.

Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

After serving as the managing editor of news at USA Today for nearly two-and-a-half years, Ron Smith is back in Milwaukee as the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service's new editor. Smith, a Marquette University alumnus, has joined forces with the Diederich-School-of-Communication-sponsored organization to rethink how the city does journalism. 

Smith plans to educate and illuminate the community through something new to NNS: original beat reporting; focusing on underrepresented topics, groups and individuals.

Michael Sears / Courtesy of the Zilber Family Foundation

Milwaukee native Joseph Zilber, the son of poor Russian Jewish immigrants, remembered growing up in Lindsay Heights behind his parents’ grocery store at 11th Street and Meinecke Avenue, according to his daughter, Marcy Zilber Jackson, Zilber Family Foundation president.

Elliot Hughes

After years of traffic fatalities and injury accidents trending down, both are now on the rise and are soaring to levels not seen in recent years. As police regroup, Milwaukee residents are grappling with the idea that a green light doesn’t mean it’s safe to go.

One night last November, Nicole Demmith was washing the dishes at her home near the intersection of Muskego and Becher streets when she heard yet another car accident outside her door — only this one came with a particularly awful clap of thunder and metal.

Black Women in Milwaukee Say ‘Me Too’

Jan 30, 2018
Elizabeth Baker

Although much of the focus of #MeToo movement has been on high-profile perpetrators and victims, WUWM and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's event Across the Divide: From #MeToo to What Now?, discussed what sexual harassment can mean to those without a platform.

Screenshot from Facebook

If the opioid epidemic is a suburban problem, someone forgot to tell Gidget DeLaTorre, 51. She’s lost two close friends to overdoses in the past 10 months and her son sits in prison, after his life spun out of control due to an opioid addiction. All of them grew up on Milwaukee’s South Side.

Sue Vliet

In 2014 the number of people receiving FoodShare benefits in Wisconsin dropped precipitously. And that sounds like a good thing: less people needing financial help to buy food should mean that there are less people in need. But it seems that might not be the case. As reporter Jabril Faraj found out, the change in recipients could have more to do with changes to eligibility requirements.

Jabril Faraj

The City of Milwaukee is touting the early success of a program in Sherman Park meant to renovate foreclosed homes and put unemployed individuals to work. However, progress has been slow and it is still uncertain whether the program will be able to meet its goals, according to community leaders and a participating developer.

Andrea Waxman

Sex trafficking remains a prominent issue in Milwaukee, but the city is not alone in its struggle to curb the problem. James Nelson has a firsthand knowledge about the dangers of sex trafficking. He was once a pimp. Now, he’s working to help trafficked people as part of the Men4Men End the Demand initiative.

The number of GED graduates at Milwaukee’s main test sites plummeted beginning in 2014, the year a new GED test — a computer-based exam that focuses on higher-order thinking — was adopted across the nation. Still, educators agree that the new test assesses the skills that are needed to succeed in today’s workplace, and the passing rate has improved — from 47 percent in 2014 to 72 percent in 2016.

Women of color in Milwaukee will be disproportionately harmed by a provision in the American Health Care Act ending Medicaid reimbursements for abortion providers, such as Planned Parenthood. This could result in severely limited services such as gynecological exams, STD testing and treatment, and contraception.

Until she was 20, Tiferet Berenbaum, 34, had never seen a gynecologist. She had never had a Pap smear, or even heard of one.

Andrea Waxman

In spring 2013, the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service started an occasional series of stories about four graduating high school students who participated in a program that helps students from low-income families get into college and earn a degree. Four years later, they checked back to see how they are doing.

Jabril Faraj

Around dusk on a Thursday night in early August, a group of about 30 black men parade down the 4300 block of N. 25th Street in Garden Homes.

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