Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

At a certain point in her new collection Nobody's Looking at You, pulling together previously uncompiled essays, Janet Malcolm fails — and it's fascinating.

Veteran comedians know all about the funny side of anger.

The late George Carlin wrote an entire bit called "Free-Floating Hostility." Jerry Seinfeld once declared in the Los Angeles Times that "All comedy starts with anger."

This story is part of American Anthem, a yearlong series on songs that rouse, unite, celebrate and call to action. Find more at NPR.org/Anthem.


It was February 1967, and 18-year-old Marine private first class Bill Ehrhart was days away from leaving for Vietnam. He had just enjoyed his last weekend off-base, and his friends had offered to drive him back to Camp Pendleton, Calif., before sunrise.

Something happens when you get a chance to see Afro-Cuban percussionist Pedrito Martinez perform. First of all, his smile radiates. It's hard to imagine someone happier than he is to make music in front of people; and as we saw during his turn behind Bob Boilen's desk, he mesmerizes with this almost otherworldly talent on congas. His hands can be a blur because they move so quickly. To the untrained eye, it's hard to see exactly what he is doing to draw out the sounds he does from his drums.

The top officers of the fashion giant Burberry are apologizing for clothing a model in a hoodie with a cord knotted in the shape of a noose at the company's London Fashion Week show on Sunday.

Initial reaction against the hoodie and nooselike drawstring came from one of the company's own models. Burberry has dropped the item from its collection.

Here's what's up with docs: They're doing great at the box office.

At last month's Sundance Film Festival, Knock Down the House broke the festival's documentary sales record: reportedly $10 million to Netflix. The film follows the 2018 campaigns of four female congressional candidates, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

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Saxophonist and composer Greg Ward's latest album, Stomping Off From Greenwood, is a tribute to Chicago, the city where he came of age as a musician. It's also one of the year's first great jazz albums.

The first time I played Ward's new album, I was riveted by its sense of momentum and possibility, and the way its easy movement among styles made music feel like an open city.

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Updated at 6:03 p.m. ET

Once a celebrated investigative reporter, the publisher of a small Alabama newspaper achieved notoriety this week by saying the Ku Klux Klan should "clean out D.C."

Eddie Herena

Visual artist Nigel Poor has spent years offering us a glimpse of life behind bars. Poor is not incarcerated, but she has worked with people inside California’s San Quentin Prison to tell the stories of everyday life.  Among the ways she’s done that is through curating a remarkable group of large-format photographs taken over the years by prison staff — some of which are on exhibit at the Milwaukee Art Museum.

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe says it's not normal for the bureau to open investigations into the president.

"We don't have a lot of experience with investigating presidents of the United States," McCabe says. "There is not a standard S.O.P. on the shelf that you pull down to say, 'Here's how it's done.'"

A film about Queen Anne of Great Britain, The Favourite, by the unorthodox Greek director Yorgos Lanthimos, will probably cadge a few Oscars. Even if it doesn't, this comic and oddly moving film has already achieved something extraordinary. It has ignited widespread interest in the life of a corpulent, gouty, myopic, staunchly Anglican queen who allegedly had passionate relationships with two ladies of her bedchamber and who was pregnant 17 times but died childless before her 50th birthday about 300 years ago.

We're being treated to a special kind performance from a tight-knit group of friends.

Courtesy of Robert Turner

Transitioning out of one industry and into another can be challenging, especially after multiple years on the job. For many professional athletes, by the time they retire or are forced from the game by injury or obsolescence, they have been in their sport for 20 or 30 years. For too many of them, they find it difficult financially and emotionally to adjust to life after sports. 

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